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Topic: Israelis/Palestinians

US opens embassy in Israel in Jerusalem, dozens dead in protests. Support move?

  • Comments: 196 |
  • Votes: 55
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Discussion started by Tok Staff:
Over 50 Palestinians are dead, while official Israel celebrates the long-awaited move. Do you support Trump's decision to move the embassy?
Background article: ... Read more
Results in this view: Y-about Time 39% - Convince Me 35% - N-wrong/reckless 26%
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Anonymous-user
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By Michael Linkroum I don't understand the motive of moving it to Jerusalem,on the other hand there will never be peace as long as Hamas and the current leaders of Iran stay in power!
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Anonymous-user
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By William Dykeman the motive was deliberetely provocative, as it the existance of israel in the islamic world, it is a vestage of european imperialism, give the jews part of germany, or better yet long island what crime did the palestininas commit that they may be dispoosed of their historical homeland?
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By Michael Linkroum Jews have also lived there for over 3000 years,just saying!
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By William Dykeman my family left france 200 years ago it is our HISTORICAL HOMELAND when i went back i went t visit as a guest in another persons country my ancestors lived and made wine on that land probably for 1000s of years okay? doesnt give me the right to go back and kick some poor french man off HIS or HER land.. so why after a people have been absent not 200 but 2000 years do they get a claim on land they lost a long time ago?
and dont say because they were forced to leave

so were my ancestors FOR SIMILAR reasons france and germany fought over the moselle for 300 years.. we were sick of it
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By Michael Linkroum I'm pretty sure Jews didn't leave there 2000 years ago,they were living there the whol e time!It's complicated but Hamas,Iran,Hezzabola(sp)are up to no good and only want to kill Jews,they are using this as an excuse,why haven't any Arab countries offered the Palestinians any land?
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By William Dykeman omg? are you serious? dont you know any history this is basic stuff!
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By William Dykeman The Jewish diaspora (Hebrew: Tfutza, תְּפוּצָה) or exile (Hebrew: Galut, גָּלוּת; Yiddish: Golus) is the dispersion of Israelites, Judahites and later Jews out of their ancestral homeland (the Land of Israel) and their subsequent settlement in other parts of the globe.

In terms of the Hebrew Bible, the term "Exile" denotes the fate of the Israelites who were taken into exile from the Kingdom of Israel during the 8th century BCE, and the Judahites from the Kingdom of Judah who were taken into exile during the 6th century BCE. While in exile, the Judahites became known as "Jews" (יְהוּדִים, or Yehudim)—"Mordecai the Jew" from the Book of Esther being the first biblical mention of the term.

The first exile was the Assyrian exile, the expulsion from the Kingdom of Israel (Samaria) begun by Tiglath-Pileser III of Assyria in 733 BCE. This process was completed by Sargon II with the destruction of the kingdom in 722 BCE, concluding a three-year siege of Samaria begun by Shalmaneser V. The next experience of exile was the Babylonian captivity, in which portions of the population of the Kingdom of Judah were deported in 597 BCE and again in 586 BCE by the Neo-Babylonian Empire under the rule of Nebuchadnezzar II.

Before the middle of the first century CE, in addition to Judea, Syria and Babylonia, large Jewish communities existed in the Roman provinces of Egypt, Cyrene and Crete and in Rome itself;[1] after the Siege of Jerusalem in 63 BCE, when the Hasmonean kingdom became a protectorate of Rome, emigration intensified. In 6 CE the region was organized as the Roman province of Judea, but the Judean population revolted against the Roman Empire in 66 CE during the period known as the First Jewish–Roman War which culminated in the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE. During the siege, the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and most of Jerusalem. This event marked the beginning of the Roman exile, also called Edom exile. Jewish leaders and elite were exiled from the land, killed, or taken to Rome as slaves.[citation needed]

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By William Dykeman In 132 CE, the remaining Jews, under Bar Kokhba, rebelled against Hadrian, per Cassius Dio, in response to Hadrian's renaming of Jerusalem to Aelia Capitolina.[2] In 135 CE, Hadrian's army defeated the Jewish armies and Jewish independence was lost. As punishment, Hadrian exiled more Jews, and forbade the Jews from living in their capital.

During the Middle Ages, due to increasing geographical dispersion and re-settlement, Jews divided into distinct regional groups which today are generally addressed according to two primary geographical groupings: the Ashkenazi of Northern and Eastern Europe, and the Sephardic Jews of Iberia (Spain and Portugal), North Africa and the Middle East. These groups have parallel histories sharing many cultural similarities as well as a series of massacres, persecutions and expulsions, such as the expulsion from Spain in 1492, the expulsion from England in 1290, and the expulsion from Arab countries in 1948–1973. Although the two branches comprise many unique ethno-cultural practices and have links to their local host populations (such as Central Europeans for the Ashkenazim and Hispanics and Arabs for the Sephardim), their shared religion and ancestry, as well as their continuous communication and population transfers, has been responsible for a unified sense of cultural and religious Jewish identity between Sephardim and Ashkenazim from the late Roman period to the present.
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By William Dykeman Before the middle of the first century CE, in addition to Judea, Syria and Babylonia, large Jewish communities existed in the Roman provinces of Egypt, Cyrene and Crete and in Rome itself;[1] after the Siege of Jerusalem in 63 BCE, when the Hasmonean kingdom became a protectorate of Rome, emigration intensified. In 6 CE the region was organized as the Roman province of Judea, but the Judean population revolted against the Roman Empire in 66 CE during the period known as the First Jewish–Roman War which culminated in the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE. During the siege, the Romans destroyed the Second Temple and most of Jerusalem. This event marked the beginning of the Roman exile, also called Edom exile. Jewish leaders and elite were exiled from the land, killed, or taken to Rome as slaves.[citation needed]
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By William Dykeman Erich Fromm, criticizing the Zionist assertion that Palestine is the land of the Jews, noting: "The principle holds that no citizen loses his property or his rights of citizenship and the citizenship right is de facto a right to which (Palestinians in Israel) have much more legitimacy than the Jews.... If all nations would suddenly claim territories in which their forefathers lived two thousands years ago, this world would be a madhouse." (Jewish Letter, February 9, 1959)