Topic: LGBT

Who should need to approve a child's decision to transition to another gender?

  • Comments: 162 |
  • Votes: 11
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Discussion started by Tok Staff:
Recent controversial case in Texas highlights problem when parents don't agree. If an child wants to transition to another gender, who should need to approve?
Background article: ... Read more
Results in this view: Both Parents 15% - One Parent Only 0% - Child's Decision 8% - Only When 18 77%
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by anon-a4e4 I realize there is room for trauma if you leave it up to the parents (and obviously this will be a troubled family if they disagree) but even the concept of a physical transition before 18 is very troubling to me (you are not yet an adult, you don't really know what you want, the consequences of your actions and understand the world). But if they are 16, say, sure of it themselves and both parents agree, I can see this being the right criteria. Definitely, however, age sensitive. I would say 16 is a reasonable "adult" age for this - like driving (yes, not adult enough but you can understand consequences at that age).
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By William Dykeman this can not be left up to the child or parents this simply should be banned for anyone under 18 and then left up to the adult individual
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By Kirby Liberty Harris I agree Willie. Sixteen is not mature enough to make this kind of decision. Eighteen might not be mature enough, BUT they are legal adults.
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By William Dykeman maybe the age should be set at 21 for something this extraordinary
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By Kirby Liberty Harris Nope, all 18 or all 21. Either you are a constitutionally protected adult or you are not. Try taking the vote from 18-20 year olds and try taking 18-20 year olds from the military. Never gonna happen. So 18 it should be.
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By William Dykeman there is nothing in the constittution that says you are an adult at 18, in fact at the time when the constittution was written 21 was generally accpeted as an adult , loo over the constitution there are no protections for people under 21, maybe not even then , governments can decide and can discriminate by age, hell you have to be 35 tobe presisent, and in many states you have to be 21 to use tobacoo and aalcohol so your argument holds no water
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By Kirby Liberty Harris The Constitution does not specifically say adult is 18 OR 21, but in modern times you are a legal adult at 18 in all 50 states, which allows you to VOTE. If you can vote then you are a legal adult. The states decide adult age not the US Constitution aka 10th amendment.
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By Kirby Liberty Harris The Equal Protection Clause makes it so all states must treat you the same as other states, so you can't have the federal voting age at 21 in one state and 18 in another. So that is a defacto 18 being the adult legal age nationwide.
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By Kirby Liberty Harris Federally you can serve in the military at 18, all constitutional rights apply to you if you can vote (18), which includes the second amendment; via prohibition repeal, the right to buy and drink alcohol; the right to marry, the right to your body aka doing drugs, prostitution, alcohol, ect.
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By Kirby Liberty Harris It is NOT fact at the time when the constitution was written 21 was generally accepted as an adult (prove it). Most people back then , depending on the state or country was between 13-16. Look up the laws from then (or lack of).
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By Kirby Liberty Harris "in many states you have to be 21 to use tobacco and alcohol" In all states you have to be 21 to buy alcohol and that violates the Constitution, because the repeal of prohibition does not allow adults to be denied the purchase and consumption of alcohol,
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By Kirby Liberty Harris PS, the Equal Protection Clause does not allow the voting age to vary, so technically the US voting age is 18, so 18 year olds can drink. It also makes it legal adults can smoke, unless they ban smoking for all legal adults.
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By Kirby Liberty Harris The age requirements for office are not the same, as rights and laws regarding what can be allowed by legal adults. Your arguments have no merit.
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By William Dykeman 18 year olds can not drink the legal voting age can not be different true, however the drinking age is set at 21 for funding and so states keep it at 21 to get voting is set but the age for driniking is 21 and there is no set age for tobacco many states have raised it to 21 and that has been soconstittutionally challenged the supreme court ruled thee is no express adult age set in the constittuion therefore for purposes other than voting/ the sky is the limit as far as age goes
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By William Dykeman the voting age maybe everythng else is not affected
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By William Dykeman no it does not at least not according to the suproem court and they according to the constittuion interpret the constittuion not you bumpkin
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By William Dykeman no they are not lok at the law there is no constitutionally designated LEGAL AGE
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By Kirby Liberty Harris Your understanding of the Constitution is deficient. The adult age is the Federal voting age. If you can vote you are an adult and can drink because of the repeal of prohibition (why the states did it, though that violates the 14th amendment equal protection clause
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By Kirby Liberty Harris The court is supposed to interpret the law not make law by their interpretation. That started later.
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By William Dykeman and so it does, interpetation leads to changes in the law, for example laws on gay marriage sodomy abortion police procedure
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By William Dykeman if you interpret a law you make a law
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By William Dykeman on the contrary
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By Kirby Liberty Harris Nope, the Founders never intended for the court to make law by their decisions.
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By Kirby Liberty Harris William Dykeman said " the voting age maybe everythng else is not affected". My answer: Wrong, Federal voting age determines who is an adult, and you can't make laws on just certain adults under the equal protection clause..