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Topic: Transportation

Another Boeing 737 Max emergency landing: would you avoid flying this plane?

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  • Votes: 9
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Discussion started by Tok Staff:
After two crashes and a global scare, one of airlines still flying the plane reports emergency landing. Would you be willing to take off on a 737 Max 8?
Background article: ... Read more
Results in this view: Y-don't Trust 50% - Convince Me 13% - N-not My Call 13% - N-it's Hysteria 25%
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Anonymous-user
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  • 30
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By Wallace Freeman I don't think it's ALL hysteria as it appears SOMETHING is in need of correction, but there have been many more successful than unsuccessful flights with this aircraft. My opinion, based upon my experience with computers, is that some tech nerd who erroneously thinks computers can be trusted with anything important, put too much computerized crap in the aircraft thinking they were making somebody's job "easier". Computers rarely make anything easier.
Anonymous-user
Anonymous-user
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By William Dykeman first of all we need better government regualtion , and second, you arent qualified to have an opinion on computerized stuff you cave man bone head, everything is computerized now
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By Wallace Freeman That must be why nothing works.
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By William Dykeman unfortunetely your computer does, things work because they are regualted they would work better if they were more regluated there is an optimal level, i will conceed that things can be too reuglated, one may base that on observation safety statitics and efficiency records safety must be balnces with perfomrance life is a blance of values, liberty must be balances against safety and public order, no right is unlimited
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By William Dykeman so you think planes were safer without computers, thats insane and you are a retard
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By Wallace Freeman Computers sure didn't keep those crashed aircraft flying.
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By William Dykeman ask yourself a simple question are safety performance of airp lanes better now or before the advent of computers, you know darn well that computers make planes safer, maybe not 100% but look at history how safe were they before and after computers?
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By William Dykeman annecdotal
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By William Dykeman Anecdotal evidence is evidence from anecdotes, i.e., evidence collected in a casual or informal manner and relying heavily or entirely on personal testimony. When compared to other types of evidence, anecdotal evidence is generally regarded as limited in value due to a number of potential weaknesses, but may be considered within the scope of scientific method as some anecdotal evidence can be both empirical and verifiable, e.g. in the use of case studies in medicine. Other anecdotal evidence, however, does not qualify as scientific evidence, because its nature prevents it from being investigated by the scientific method.
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By Wallace Freeman I doubt there are ANY aircraft that can approach the safety record of the DC-3 which was designed in 1936 and is still in service today hauling passengers and cargo.

The DC-3, first produced in 1936 by what was then the Douglas Aircraft Company, was a utility passenger-cargo workhorse for United States forces in World War II as well as for many airlines of that era, says Ron Davies, Lindbergh professor of aerospace history at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington.

The aging plane's historical significance is lost on the few passengers who express concern about its safety. ''How do you think it got to be this old?'' responds John Van Arsdale Sr., retired founder of the airline. Workhorse in World War II Source: https://www.nytimes.com/1982/08/22/us/longest-flying-dc-3-keeps-breaking-records.html
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By William Dykeman List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3
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This is a list of pages listing accidents and incidents involving the Douglas DC-3A, including aircraft based on the DC-3 airframe such as the Douglas C-47 Skytrain and Lisunov Li-2. Military accidents are included; and hijackings and incidents of terrorism are covered, although acts of war are outside the scope of this list.

Contents
1 1930s
2 1940s
3 1950s
4 1960s
5 1980s
6 1990s
7 Since 2000
8 Notes
1930s
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in the 1930s
1940s
1940
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1940
1941
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1941
1942
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1942
1943
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1943
1944
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1944
1945
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1945
1946
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1946
1947
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1947
1948
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1948
1949
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1949
1950s
1950
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1950
1951
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1951
1952
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1952
1953
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1953
1954
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1954
1955
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1955
1956
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1956
1957
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1957
1957 Cebu Douglas C-47 crash which caused the death of the 7th President of the Philippines, Ramon Magsaysay
1958
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1958
1959
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1959
1960s
1960
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1960
1961
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1961
1962
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1962
1963
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1963
1964
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1964
1965
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1965
1966
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1966
1967
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1967
1968
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1968
1969
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1969
1970
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By William Dykeman List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1970
1971
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1971
1972
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1972
1973
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1973
1974
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1974
1975
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1975
1976
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1976
1977
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1977
1978
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1978
1979
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1979
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By William Dykeman List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1970
1971
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1971
1972
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1972
1973
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1973
1974
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1974
1975
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1975
1976
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1976
1977
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1977
1978
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1978
1979
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1979
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By William Dykeman List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1970
1971
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1971
1972
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1972
1973
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1973
1974
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1974
1975
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1975
1976
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1976
1977
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1977
1978
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1978
1979
List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in 1979
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By William Dykeman This is a list of accidents and incidents involving the Douglas DC-3A that have taken place since 1 January 2000, including aircraft based on the DC-3 airframe such as the Douglas C-47 Skytrain, Basler BT-67 and Lisunov Li-2. Military accidents are included; and hijackings and incidents of terrorism are covered, although acts of war are outside the scope of this list.

Contents
1 2000
2 2001
3 2002
4 2003
5 2004
6 2005
7 2006
8 2007
9 2008
10 2009
11 2010
12 2012
13 2013
14 2014
15 2016
16 2017
17 2018
18 2019
19 See also
20 References
21 Notes
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By William Dykeman 2000
17 March
Douglas DC-3C C-FNTF of Points North Air Services crashed at Ennadai Lake Airport in Canada while attempting a go-around. Both crew died, the cause was found to be that the aircraft's centre of gravity was too far to the rear, possibly due to the cargo shifting in flight. Both crew members were found to have high levels of carboxyhaemoglobin in their blood. The flight had departed from Points North Landing Airport, Points North Landing, Saskatchewan.[1][2]
20 July
Douglas C-47A N54AA of Allied Air Freight suffered an engine failure on take-off from Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport, Bahamas on a cargo flight to Nassau International Airport, Bahamas. The aircraft crashed while attempting to return to Grand Bahama and was destroyed. Both crew died.[3]
2 September
Basler BT-67 FAC1659 of the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana was destroyed when it flew into the 11,200 feet (3,400 m) high Mount Montezuma in Colombia; all seven on board died.[4]
9 November
In El Salvador, Basler BT-67 FAS119 of the Fuerza Aérea Salvadoreña was damaged beyond economic repair on landing at Los Comandos Airport, Los Comandos. The aircraft suffered brake failure, overran the runway and collided with a tree.[5]
2001
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By William Dykeman 2001

N3239T
23 January
In the United States, Douglas DC-3C N19454 of Majestic Air Cargo was destroyed when it flew into Table Top Mountain at an altitude of 1,500 feet (460 m) while on a flight from Unalaska Airport to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska.[6] Investigation revealed that no flight plan had been filed, which delayed the reporting of the aircraft as overdue. Both crew members tested positive for drugs - the captain for cocaine and the first officer for amitriptyline and nortriptyline.[7]
25 January
RUTACA Airlines Flight 225, operated by Douglas DC-3C YV-224-C, crashed at Ciudad Bolívar in Venezuela; all 24 on board plus one person on the ground died. Another person on the ground was seriously injured. There were unconfirmed reports that a 25th person may have been on board the aircraft. The aircraft was on a non-scheduled domestic passenger flight from Tomás de Heres Airport, Ciudad Bolivar to Del Caribe "Santiago Mariño" International Airport, Porlamar and had developed an engine problem shortly after take-off.[8][9]
15 March
In the United States, Douglas C-47A N842MB of Jim Hankins Air Service made a successful emergency landing at Donalsonville Municipal Airport, Donalsonville, Georgia following an inflight engine failure, fire and separation of the starboard engine. The aircraft was on a cargo flight from Panama City-Bay County International Airport, Panama City, Florida to Southwest Georgia Regional Airport, Albany, Georgia, it was assessed as damaged beyond economic repair.[10][11] The aircraft was transported to the Museum of Aviation, Warner Robins, Georgia in August 2005.[12][13]
4 April
Douglas DC-3A N19BA of Roblex Aviation ditched in the sea off Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport in Carolina, Puerto Rico after suffering a double engine failure while on a local training flight. Both crew escaped. Damage to the aircraft was described as minor.[14][15]
9 July
In the United States, Douglas C-47A N3239T of the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Space Coast Regional Airport, Titusville, Florida. The aircraft was returning from an air show at Pope Air Force Base, Fayetteville, North Carolina and had made a refuelling stop at Moore County Airport, Southern Pines, North Carolina. The aircraft was later repaired and returned to service.[16][17]
December
Air Katanga Douglas C-53 ZS-OJD was written off in a landing accident at Lubumbashi International Airport in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, after a delivery flight that originated in South Africa.[18][19
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By William Dykeman 2002
21 May
In the United States, Douglas DC-3A XB-JBR of Aero JBR ditched in Lake Casa Blanca, Texas after a double engine failure while performing a touch-and-go at Laredo International Airport.[20] It is reported that one of the engines suffered a propeller overspeed condition. All three crew escaped from the submerged aircraft.[21]
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By William Dykeman 2003

AMI DC-3-65TP
10 March
Aero Modifications International (AMI) DC-3-65TPA ZS-MFY of Rossair Contracts was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Rumbek Airport in Sudan due to encountering windshear. The aircraft was repaired, and flown out on 17 April 2003.[22][23]
19 March
Aerotaxi Flight 882, operated by Douglas DC-3C CU-T1192, was hijacked on a flight from Rafael Cabrera Airport, Nueva Gerona, Cuba to José Martí International Airport, Havana, Cuba. The aircraft landed in the United States at Key West International Airport, Key West, Florida, where the six hijackers were detained.[24][25]
30 April
In Colombia, Basler BT-67 PNC-0212 of the Servicio Aéreo de Policía was damaged beyond repair when it overran the runway at Aguas Claras Airport, Ocaña.[26]
2 October
A Douglas DC-3 operating an illegal flight for the Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia was destroyed by the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana at Bocas del Rosario in Colombia.[27]
21 November
Douglas C-47A ZS-BXF, operating South African Air Force Historic Flight Flight 668, was substantially damaged in a forced landing in South Africa after both engines failed shortly after take-off from Lanseria International Airport, Johannesburg, due to fuel mismanagement. The aircraft's destination was AFB Swartkop, Centurion.[28] Repairs were carried out at OR Tambo International Airport, Kempton Park, Gauteng. The restored aircraft flew out on 10 November 2006.[29]
30 December
Douglas DC-3C N781T of Tol-Air Services was substantially damaged when the starboard undercarriage collapsed on landing at Cyril E. King Airport, Charlotte Amalie, United States Virgin Islands after a flight that originated at San Juan, Puerto Rico.[30]
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By William Dykeman does it hurt to be that stupid?